Welcome to a huge list of best practices in user experience (UX), user interfaces (UI), and interaction design.

Whether you’re designing a website or mobile app, you’ll learn 125+ tactics to optimize its usability.

Bonus: You can download a summary PDF so that you can reference the article moving forward.

Table of Contents

I organized these best practices into various categories and strategies. Click a strategy to view SPECIFIC examples and applications.

Control the User’s Focus and Attention

Guide Users Toward the End Goal

Reduce Mental Effort and Maintain Flow

Maximize Compatibility for All Users and Scenarios

Help Users Minimize and Overcome Potential Errors

Control the User’s Focus and Attention

Emphasize a Point of Entry in the Interface

Every interface should have a clear starting point. Where should viewers look first? Make it clear.

Add Visual Contrast to Page Headlines

Best Practice #1 - Add Visual Contrast to Page Headlines

Guide Users Through a Visual Hierarchy

Control the user’s experience by guiding them through the interface. Where should they look first, second, and third? Establish that hierarchy.

Avoid Trapping Negative Space in the Composition

Best Practice #2 - Avoid Trapping Negative Space in the Composition

Use a One Column Layout

Best Practice #3 - Use a One Column Layout

Overlap a Design Element to Emphasize Continuity

Best Practice #4 - Overlap a Design Element to Emphasize Continuity

Design the Layout Using Gestalt Principles

We’re inundated with stimuli. According to gestalt psychology, we try to overcome that chaos by simplifying our perception. We group things. We categorize elements. We look for the whole.

Some principles include: similarity, proximity, closure, connection, continuity, and figure/ground.

Gestalt Principles

Group Similar Functions or Menu Items by Proximity

Best Practice #5 - Group Similar Functions or Menu Items by Proximity

Position Headlines Closer to Respective Sections

Best Practice #6 - Align Headlines Closer to Respective Sections

Constrain Headlines to Respective Sections

Best Practice #7 - Constrain Headlines to Respective Sections

Depict Interface Changes Without Disrupting the User

Sometimes you’ll need to adjust the interface in front of the user. Make those changes noticeable, yet nondisruptive.

Visibly Animate Changes in the Interface

Best Practice #9 - Visibly Animate Transitions in the Interface

Differentiate Elements That Triggered an Error

Best Practice #8 - Place Error Messages Above Forms and Adjacent to Elements

Remove or Deemphasize Unnecessary Information

Our mental focus is finite. Unnecessary elements will deplete those resources. So keep users focused on the important information and functions.

Obscure Backgrounds Behind Popup or Modal Boxes

Best Practice #10 - Obscure Backgrounds Behind Popup or Modal Boxes

Maximize Data-Ink Ratios in All Imagery

Best Practice #11 - Maximize Data-Ink Ratios in All Imagery

Remove Unnecessary Borders From Design Elements

Best Practice #12 - Remove Unnecessary Borders From Design Elements

Remove Redundant or Self-Explanatory Instructions

Best Practice #13 - Remove Redundant or Self-Explanatory Instructions

Hide Infrequent But Necessary Settings, Features, and Information

Best Practice #27 - Hide Infrequent But Necessary Settings, Features, and Information

Indicate Whether Content Exists Beyond the Fold

Nowadays, most browsers hide scroll bars when they’re inactive. You need “scroll hints” to communicate whether content exists beyond the fold.

Extend Elements Through the Fold

Best Practice #14 - Extend Elements Through the Fold

Add a Shadow to Indicate Depth

Best Practice #15 - Add a Shadow to Indicate Depth

UX Example - Adding Shadow to Indicate Depth

Indicate More Content With Words or Graphics

Best Practice #16 - Indicate More Content With Words or Graphics

Guide Users Toward the End Goal

Now that you’ve captured and directed the user’s attention, help them achieve their goal.

Position Frequent Functions and Important Data Closer to Users

Predict the user’s intention. Then position that goal as close as possible.

Filter or Jump to Items That Users Are Searching

Best Practice #17 - Filter or Jump to Items That Users Are Searching

Create Smart Defaults Based on Frequently Chosen Input

Best Practice #18 - Create Smart Defaults Based on Frequently Chosen Input

Include Important Data on Product Listing Pages

Oftentimes, users will pogo stick. They click an item to look for information. Then they’ll return to the previous page to repeat that process with another item. That’s poor usability. Minimize pogo-sticking by placing important information on primary pages.

Best Practice #21 - Include Important Data on Product Listing Pages

If you don’t like the extra clutter, you could include that information on hover (see next tactic).

Provide Useful Information on Hover

Best Practice #22 - Provide Useful Information on Hover

Expose Frequently Used Functions

Best Practice #23 - Expose Frequently Used Functions

Display Primary Data or Statuses in a Dashboard

UX Tactic 25 - Display Primary Data or Statuses in Main Dashboard

Position Common Answers at the Top of Drop Down Lists

UX Tactic 26 - Position Common Answers At the Top of Drop Down Lists

Communicate the Statuses of Interactions

Reduce uncertainty by conveying all pertinent information.

Display Current Progress and Time Remaining on Machine-Driven Tasks

Best Practice #28 - Display Current Progress and Time Remaining on Machine-Driven Tasks

Communicate the Current Phase of Complex or Lengthy Interactions

Best Practice #29 - Communicate the Incremental Phase of Interactions

Reveal the Number of Steps Within a Sequence

Best Practice #33 - Reveal the Number of Steps Within a Sequence

Reveal the Number of Items in a Category

Best Practice #89 - Reveal the Number of Items in a Category

Offer Multiple Ways to Accomplish the Same Task

Users prefer different workflows. Create different paths for each goal, and let users choose the most appropriate path for their workflow.

Let Users Log In Via Username or Email

Best Practice #30 - Let Users Log In Via Username or Email

Offer Keyboard Shortcuts for Repetitive Functions

Best Practice #31 - Offer Keyboard Shortcuts for Repetitive Functions

Let Users Drag and Drop Elements

Best Practice #19 - Let Users Drag and Drop Elements

Let Users Directly Edit Data

Best Practice #20 - Let Users Directly Edit Data

Communicate Requirements or Parameters for an Interaction

Prepare users for each interaction. What will they need? How do they proceed?

Describe the Input That You Require From Users

Best Practice #34 - Describe the Input That You Require From Users

Give Real-Time Password Requirements and Feedback

Best Practice #35 - Give Real-Time Password Requirements and Feedback

Prepopulate Form Elements With Universal Parameters

Best Practice #36 - Prepopulate Form Elements With Universal Parameters

Indicate Required and Optional Form Elements

Best Practice #37 - Indicate Required and Optional Form Elements

Communicate the Expected Outcome of an Interaction

Before users interact with an element, they should understand the intended outcome.

Use Descriptive Button Labels

Best Practice #39 - Use Descriptive Labels for Buttons

Show a Preview of the Output Based on the Current Input

Best Practice #38 - Show a Preview of the Output Based on the Current Input

Indicate or Preview the Next Item in a Sequence

Best Practice #24 - Indicate or Preview the Next Item in a Sequence

Use Smart Menu Items to Clarify Actions

Best Practice #40 - Use Smart Menu Items to Clarify Actions

Reward or Reassure Users When They Make Progress

Are users making progress? Was their interaction successful? Let them know. And entice them to continue.

Maintain Congruency Between Links and Target Pages

Best Practice #41 - Maintain Congruency Between Links and Target Pages

Provide Quick Wins During Onboarding

Best Practice #42 - Provide Quick Wins During Onboarding

Start Progress Bars Above 0%

Best Practice #43 - Start Progress Bars Above 0%

Solve the User’s Core Intent

Oftentimes, we solve surface-level needs. Go deeper. Always brainstorm why users need certain features or information. Then solve the underlying intent.

Indicate Whether Your Office is Open or Closed

Best Practice #44 - Indicate Whether Your Office is Open or Closed

Indicate the Recency of Events

Best Practice #45 - Indicate the Recency of Events

Reduce Mental Effort and Maintain Flow

In addition to guiding users, reduce their cognitive workflow. That way, you prolong their state of “flow.”

Minimize User Calculations

Never make the user perform math. Let the computer handle it.

Indicate the Number of Items Remaining

Best Practice #46 - Indicate the Number of Items Remaining

Convey the User’s Current Location Within the Interface

Interfaces are like airports. Without a “you are here” marker, users can get lost. So create those markers.

Highlight the Section Within the Navigation Menu

Best Practice #47 - Highlight the Section Within the Navigation Menu

Provide Breadcrumbs or Sequence Maps in Complex Interfaces

Best Practice #48 - Provide Breadcrumbs or Sequence Maps in Complex Interfaces

Put Descriptive or Useful Information at the Beginning of Page Titles

Best Practice #49 - Put Descriptive Terms at the Beginning of the Browser's Page Title

Simplify Choice Tasks

Choices require effort. Reduce that effort by simplifying those tasks.

Indicate the Options That Most Users Choose

Best Practice #50 - Indicate the Options That Most Users Choose

Provide a Curated List of Common Search Terms

Best Practice #51 - Provide a Curated List of Common Search Terms

Create Tight Categories Within Navigation Menus

Best Practice #52 - Create Tight Categories Within Navigation Menus

Use Conventional Web Design Interfaces

Creativity is great. But don’t stray far from a conventional design. Users are accustomed to certain layouts and structures. Those conventional designs are popular because they work.

Use Conventional Navigation Menus

Best Practice #53 - Use Conventional Navigation Menus

Put Utilities in the Top Right Corner

Best Practice #54 - Put Utilities in the Top Right Corner

Provide Feedback After Each Interaction

When users interact with your interface, they should experience real-time feedback. Was something successful? Was it unsuccessful? What changed?

Display Success Messages After Important Interactions

Best Practice #55 - Display Success Messages After Important Interactions

Indicate Which Items the Cursor is Hovering Over

Best Practice #56 - Indicate Which Items the Cursor is Hovering Over

Minimize the Negative Effects of Waiting Periods

Eliminate all unnecessary waiting periods. If users need to wait, then minimize those negative effects.

Use Cool Colors in Loading Animations to Decrease Arousal

Blue reduces arousal (and increases relaxation). With blue loading elements, users perceive quicker loading times (Gorn et al., 2004). See my article on color for more detail.

Best Practice #57 - Use Cool Colors in Loading Animations to Decrease Arousal

Keep Users Engaged During Lengthy Waiting Periods

Best Practice #58 - Keep Users Engaged During Lengthy Waiting Periods

Prevent Users From Uploading Files That Are Incompatible

Best Practice #59 - Prevent Users From Uploading Files That Are Incompatible

Display a Running Tally of Tasks Occurring

Best Practice #60 - Display a Running Tally of Tasks Occurring

Minimize the User’s Reliance on Memory

Don’t force the user to remember anything. Keep all pertinent information in the open.

Keep Form Labels Visible At All Times

Avoid inline labels that disappear when users click inside the element.

Best Practice #61 - Keep Form Labels Visible At All Times

Position Placeholder Text Outside the Form Element

Best Practice #62 - Position Placeholder Text Outside the Form Element

Add Copy Buttons to Movable Input

Best Practice #63 - Add Copy Buttons to Movable Input

Minimize Zig Zagging Eye Patterns

Reduce the amount of back-and-forth eye motions. Keep all complementary data within close distances.

Merge Congruent Data to Help Users Compare Items

Best Practice #64 - Merge Congruent Data to Help Users Compare Items

Align Form Labels Directly Adjacent to Elements

Best Practice #65 - Align Form Labels Directly Adjacent to Elements

Communicate Which Items Are Clickable or Interactive

Users should identify which elements are interactive (and how to interact with them). If you’re familiar with UX/UI, then you probably know signifiers and affordances, popularized by Don Norman in The Design of Everyday Things.

Design Buttons Using 3D Characteristics

Best Practice #66 - Design Buttons Using 3D Characteristics

Add Dotted Textures to Drag and Drop Elements

Best Practice #67 - Add Dotted Textures to Drag and Drop Elements

Use Icons and Symbols to Convey the Meaning of an Interaction

You can create most of these icons using various shapes in PowerPoint or Keynote.

Best Practice #68 - Use Icons and Symbols to Convey the Meaning of an Interaction

Communicate Using Familiar Words and Symbols

In most cases, clarity trumps creativity or jargon.

Speak the Language of the User, Not the System

Best Practice #69 - Speak the Language of the User, Not the System

Offer a Translate Button When Foreign Languages Appear

Best Practice #70 - Offer a Translate Button When Foreign Languages Appear

Choose Colors That Are Semantically Congruent

When colors are incongruent, users have more trouble processing the information. Currently, meetup.com has great usability. However, they’re using red to confirm attendance (when they should be using green):

Best Practice #71 - Choose Colors That Are Semantically Congruent

Maximize the Scannability of Your Interface

Most users will process your content by scanning it. And you shouldn’t fight it. Embrace it. Make your interface more conducive to scanning.

Keep Paragraphs Short and Highlight Key Terms

Best Practice #72 - Keep Paragraphs Short and Highlight Key Terms

Position Important Information at Beginning of List Items

Best Practice #73 - Position Important Information at Beginning of List Items

Add Row Stripes to Your Tables

Best Practice #74 - Add Row Stripes to Your Tables

Write Standalone Subheadlines

Best Practice #75 - Write Standalone Subheadlines

Break Up Text With Visual Variety

Best Practice #76 - Break Up Text With Visual Variety

Maximize the Readability of Text

Obviously, text should be readable. But here are some tips to make it more readable.

Create Strong Contrast Between the Text and Background

Be careful displaying text over backgrounds. You might need to add contrast through an overlay or blur. Let’s add text over my beautiful face…

Best Practice #77 - Create Strong Contrast Between the Text and Background

Left Align the Majority of Body Text

Best Practice #78 - Left Align the Majority of Body Text

Use Consistent Patterns Throughout the Interface

With inconsistent patterns, users will need more time to learn your interface. Simplify it by maintaining a consistent layout and appearance.

Create a Front-End Style Guide

Create a document summarizing the design specifications for each element in your interface.

Best Practice #79 - Create a Front-End Style Guide

Other elements include:

  • Colors
  • Grids and Layouts
  • Placement and Positioning
  • Size and Shape
  • Labels and Language
  • Navigation
  • Tables
  • Lists
  • Links
  • Voice and Tone

Need inspiration? Look through Mailchimp’s style guide.

Keep Navigation Menus in the Same Position

Best Practice #80 - Keep Navigation Menus in the Same Position

Create Beautiful Designs With Visual Balance

Designs are more usable when they’re aesthetically pleasing — a principle called the aesthetic-usability effect (Kurosu & Kashimura, 1995).

Construct Designs Using Mathematical Principles

Best Practice #81 - Construct Designs Using Mathematical Principles

Choose Contrasting Fonts

When some people choose a matching typeface, they search for a font that looks similar to the existing one. But that’s the wrong approach. Oftentimes, the similarity will look like a mistake.

Instead, be deliberate. Choose typefaces with noticeable contrast. If you’re a newb designer, you can choose a serif vs sans-serif combination (serifs are the “twigs” on the ends of letters).

Best Practice #82 - Choose Contrasting Fonts

Maximize the Compatibility for All Users and Scenarios

Your users are different people with different goals. Design your interface so that it’s compatible for everyone.

Maximize Compatibility With the User’s Knowledge and Skill Level

Your users will be novices, experts, or a mixture. Design your interface accordingly.

Use the Proper Amount of Onboarding

There are four main onboarding strategies:

Best Practice #83 - Use the Proper Amount of Onboarding

Those four approaches align nicely in a 2 x 2 matrix. Use the following diagram to choose the best approach for your interface.

Onboarding Matrix

Add Tooltips to Coach Novice Users Without Disrupting Expert Users

Best Practice #84 - Add Tooltips to Coach Novice Users Without Disrupting Expert Users

Use Card Sorting to Construct the Information Architecture

  • Use open card sorting if you want to see how users determine or conceptualize the menu categories.
  • Use closed card sorting if you want to see how users organize existing elements into pre-determined categories.

Best Practice #85 - Use Card Sorting to Construct the Information Acrhitecture

Maximize Compatibility With the User’s Workflow

Users will have different needs. Customize your interface toward those different workflows.

Let Users Control the Appearance of Data

Best Practice #86 - Let Users Control the Appearance of Data

Let Users Control the Order of Data

Best Practice #87 - Let Users Control the Order of Data

Other sorting criteria include:

  • Alphabetically
  • Availability
  • Categorically
  • Date
  • Distance
  • Popularity
  • Price
  • Relevance
  • Size

Let Users Control the Quantity of Data

Best Practice #88 - Let Users Control the Quantity of Data

Construct Personas to Identify Specific Workflows

Best Practice #90 - Use Personas to Optimize the Interface

Let Users Open Pages in New Tabs

Many users will page park. They’ll open tabs to read later.

Best Practice #91 - Let Users Open Pages in New Tabs

Maximize the Accessibility of Your Interface

Make your interface accessible to people with disabilities. Not only is it a best practice, but you could also face legal consequences (depending on your product).

Use Semantic Labels in HTML5

Best Practice #92 - Use Semantic Labels in HTML5

Use Multiple Cues to Communicate Information

Around 8 percent of males are colorblind (Chan, Goh, & Tan, 2014). Never convey meaning through color alone. Always offer additional cues.

Best Practice #93 - Use Multiple Cues to Communicate Information

Maximize Compatibility for All Inputs and Extreme Cases

Users should be able to enter a wide range of input without consequences.

Resolve Unfavorable Outcomes in Automatically Generated Messages

Best Practice #94 - Resolve Unfavorable Outcomes in Automatically Generated Messages

Use Form Elements That Accept Various Formats of Input

Best Practice #95 - Use Form Elements That Accept Various Formats of Input

Display Results That Solve the Searcher’s Need

Best Practice #96 - Display Results That Solve the Searcher's Need

Use Search Fields That Handle Typos, Synonyms, and Variants

Best Practice #97 - Use Search Fields That Handle Typos, Synonyms, and Variants

Maximize Compatibility for All Mediums

Your interface should work in all environments (e.g., devices, browsers, etc.).

Customize Instructions for the User’s Browser

Best Practice #98 - Customize Instructions for the User's Browser

Use One-Window Drilldowns on Small Devices

Best Practice #99 - Use One-Window Drilldowns on Small Devices

Help Users Minimize and Overcome Potential Errors

In most interfaces, errors are unavoidable. If they do happen, help users overcome them quickly and easily.

Prevent the Possibility of Errors

When designing your interface, don’t immediately focus on solutions. Rather, try to make errors impossible to occur (referred to as poka-yoke).

Remove, Disable, or Replace Buttons When Users Click Them

Don’t tell users to click “Submit” once. If they can click more than once, they will. Instead, disable buttons when users click them. That way, duplicate submissions are impossible.

Best Practice #100 - Remove, Disable, or Replace Buttons When Users Click Them

Only Offer Inputs That Are Acceptable

Best Practice #101 - Only Offer Inputs That Are Acceptable

Use Responsive Enabling or Disclosure in Form Elements

Best Practice #102 - Use Responsive Enabling or Disclosure in Form Elements

Structure Text Fields to Match the Required Input

Best Practice #103 - Structure Text Fields to Match the Required Input

Monitor Signals That Are Typical in Errors

What are common errors in your interface? Identify signals that are inherent in those errors. Then monitor when those signals occur.

Search for Wording That Contradicts User Intent

Best Practice #104 - Search for Wording That Contradicts User Intent

Remind Users if They’ve Already Purchased an Item

Best Practice #105 - Remind Users if They've Already Purchased an Item

Differentiate Powerful Functions to Minimize Slips

Users will lose focus. You can’t prevent it. However, you should visually distinguish powerful functions so that you minimize the possibility of damaging errors.

Separate Powerful Functions by Space or Color

Best Practice # 106 - Separate Powerful Functions by Space or Color

Add Constraints to Significant Irreversible Changes

Best Practice #107 - Add Constraints to Significant Irreversible Changes

Provide Easy Ways to Revert or Escape

Always give users the option to return to a previous page or safe/recognizable area.

Use Undos Rather Than Confirmations

Best Practice #108 - Use Undos Rather Than Confirmations

Offer an Escape Hatch on All Pages and Functions

For example, some drop down menus offer no escape hatch. When users click an option, they can’t leave it blank anymore.

Best Practice #109 - Offer an Escape Hatch on All Pages and Functions

Provide a Visible Close on Popups and Modal Boxes

Best Practice #110 - Provide a Visible Close on Popups and Modal Boxes

Minimize the Negative Effects of Leaving Sequences

Users should be able to return to a sequence in the same position with the same data.

Save Data That Users Enter

Best Practice #111 - Save Data That Users Enter

Let Users Return to the Same Position in a Sequence

Best Practice #112 - Let Users Return to the Same Position in a Sequence

Extend Movable Paths and Clickable Areas

Users aren’t perfect. They make mistakes with the cursor. Create interfaces that are flexible and forgiving.

Add a Transparent Border to Small Buttons

Best Practice #113 - Add a Transparent Border to Small Buttons

Add a Slight Delay to Hover Pop Ups and Drop Down Menus

Best Practice #114 - Add a Slight Delay to Hover Pop Ups and Drop Down Menus

Hyperlink the Entire Menu Option Container

Best Practice #115 - Hyperlink the Entire Menu Option Container

Hyperlink Primary Menus, List Items, and Complementary Icons

Oftentimes, users click items that aren’t clickable. Don’t fight those mistakes. Instead, add clickable functionality to those common areas.

Best Practice #116 - Hyperlink Primary Menus, List Items, and Complementary Icons

Provide Useful and Supportive Error Messages

Never give a standard “there was an error” message. Explain the reason — and ideally the solution — to the error.

Explain the Reason for Validation Errors

Best Practice #117 - Explain the Reason for Validation Errors

Point Users Toward Documentation or Support for Complex Errors

Best Practice #118 - Point Users Toward Documentation or Support for Complex Errors

Avoid Saying “You” in Error Messages

Best Practice #119 - Avoid Saying %22You%22 in Error Messages

Keep a Record of the User’s Previous Actions

Remind users of their past actions in your interface.

Display the User’s Recent Searches

Best Practice #120 - Display the User's Recent Searches

Use Different Colors for Visited Links

Best Practice #121 - Use Different Colors for Visited Links

Indicate Which Items Users Have Already Viewed

Best Practice #122 - Indicate Which Items Users Have Already Viewed

Analyze User Behavior to Find Interface Issues

Always iterate and improve your interface. Use these tactics to get started.

Gather User Feedback in Appropriate Places

Best Practice #123 - Gather User Feedback in Appropriate Places

Create Alerts for Increases in 404 Errors

Best Practice #124 - Create Alerts for Increases in 404 Errors

Identify Pages Where Users Are Pogo-Sticking

If a page is receiving many views (yet few unique views), then double check whether users are pogo sticking on that page

Best Practice #125 - Identify Pages Where Users Are Pogo-Sticking

Final Thoughts

How I Compiled These Best Practices

I usually focus heavily on academic research. However, web usability is evolving so quickly. So I couldn’t find many useful and timely studies. Instead, I compiled these best practices by reading a bunch of UX/UI books.

Maybe I went a little overboard…

UX Books

I read those books from cover to cover, looking for concrete actionable tactics. Afterward, I supplemented my list by (a) going through online guides (e.g., GoodUI has a great list) and (b) studying current platforms with strong reputations for usability (e.g., Mailchimp).

Here are the books from the previous image (from top to bottom):

  1. The Design of Everyday Things by Don Norman
  2. Simple and Usable by Giles Colborne
  3. UX Strategy by Jaime Levy
  4. Lean UX by Jeff Gothelf and Josh Seiden
  5. Microinteractions by Dan Saffer
  6. Interdisciplinary Interaction Design by James Pannafino
  7. Don’t Make Me Think by Steve Krug
  8. 100 Things Every Designer Needs to Know About People by Susan Weinschenk
  9. 100 MORE Things Every Designer Needs to Know About People by Susan Weinschenk
  10. Neuro Web Design by Susan Weinschenk
  11. The Non-Designer’s Design Book by Robin Williams
  12. Design for Emotion by Trevor van Gorp and Edie Adams
  13. Usable Usability by Eric Reiss
  14. Visual Thinking for Design by Colin Ware
  15. The UX Book by Rex Hartson and Pardha Pyla
  16. Designing Interfaces by Jenifer Tidwell
  17. CSS Secrets by Lea Verou
  18. Design Elements: A Graphic Style Manual by Timothy Samara
  19. Graphic Design Solutions by Robin Landa
  20. Universal Principles of Design by William Lidwell, Kristina Holden, & Jill Butler
  21. Digital Design Essentials by Raj Lal
  22. Universal Methods of Design  by Bella Martin and Bruce Harrington
  23. Envisioning Information by Edward Tufte

Next Steps

I organized this article by categories and strategies. However, you can download a summary PDF organizing the tactics by design elements (e.g., forms, buttons, etc.). Whenever you’re designing those elements in your interface, you can reference the PDF.

Also, this list is just the beginning. Moving forward, I’ll be adding new tactics periodically. In the meantime, though, you can read my article on conversion optimization to further optimize your site.